2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/607822
Title:
The Effect of Humor on Learning in a Planetarium
Authors:
Fisher, Martin
Abstract:
The effect of humor on retention of information was examined. The planetar- ium at COSI, Ohio’s Center of Science & Industry in Columbus, was the source of the study. General public museum visitors were the subjects. A total of 495 adult subjects, ages 18 and older, were involved. Subjects were presented with one of two versions of a 15-minute taped general astronomy show. The two versions were identical except that one had humorous in- serts. The humor in the humorous version was related to and integrated with the educational material and was presented at a fast pace. Humor was placed every 90 seconds in the middle of the concept being explained. A total of 20 concepts were described in the show, 10 of which had humorous inserts and which alternated with the 10 nonhumorous concepts. After the show visitors received a 20-question test to determine their short-term retention of the information. The questions were taken directly from the show’s script. The test was of a fill-in-the-blank format. Results indicated that the visitors who saw a humorous show had less retention of the instructional material and scored lower on the test than visitors who saw a nonhumorous show.
Journal:
Science Education
Issue Date:
15-May-1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/607822
Submitted date:
2016-03-13
Document Source:
Peer Reviewed
Language:
English Paper
Type Of Resource:
Empirical Research
Empirical Methodology:
Quantitative
Learning Environment:
Informal
Research Setting:
Planetarium
Subjects:
Adult Learners
Construct:
Content Knowledge Humor
Content:
General/Broad Knowledge of Astronomy Content
Nation:
USA
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Martinen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T09:03:55Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-04T09:03:55Zen
dc.date.issued1997-05-15en
dc.date.submitted2016-03-13en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/607822en
dc.description.abstractThe effect of humor on retention of information was examined. The planetar- ium at COSI, Ohio’s Center of Science & Industry in Columbus, was the source of the study. General public museum visitors were the subjects. A total of 495 adult subjects, ages 18 and older, were involved. Subjects were presented with one of two versions of a 15-minute taped general astronomy show. The two versions were identical except that one had humorous in- serts. The humor in the humorous version was related to and integrated with the educational material and was presented at a fast pace. Humor was placed every 90 seconds in the middle of the concept being explained. A total of 20 concepts were described in the show, 10 of which had humorous inserts and which alternated with the 10 nonhumorous concepts. After the show visitors received a 20-question test to determine their short-term retention of the information. The questions were taken directly from the show’s script. The test was of a fill-in-the-blank format. Results indicated that the visitors who saw a humorous show had less retention of the instructional material and scored lower on the test than visitors who saw a nonhumorous show.en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-05-04T09:03:55Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 d43a4f6b-b27a-4a1a-b967-1493c4b030e5.pdf: 190660 bytes, checksum: 182168db869b083c6304cb59e6d0256c (MD5) Previous issue date: 1997-05-15en
dc.language.isoEnglish Paperen
dc.titleThe Effect of Humor on Learning in a Planetariumen
dc.typePeer Revieweden
dc.identifier.journalScience Educationen
dc.type.resourceEmpirical Researchen
dc.istar.learningenvironmentInformalen
dc.istar.constructContent Knowledge Humoren
dc.istar.contentGeneral/Broad Knowledge of Astronomy Contenten
dc.istar.nationUSAen
dc.istar.empiricalmethodologyQuantitativeen
dc.istar.researchsettingPlanetariumen
dc.istar.subjectAdult Learnersen
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