GENDER DIFFERENCES IN SCIENCE MISCONCEPTIONS IN EIGHTH GRADE ASTRONOMY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/607873
Title:
GENDER DIFFERENCES IN SCIENCE MISCONCEPTIONS IN EIGHTH GRADE ASTRONOMY
Authors:
Gray, Pamela A.
Abstract:
The intent of this study was to examine the relationship between gender and science misconceptions at the eighth grade level. This study attempted to ascertain if there are significant differences between genders in the number and types of science misconceptions eighth grade science students have. The specific misconceptions used in this investigation concern gravity, seasons, and phases of the moon. It remains a serious problem in science education that girls are being inadequately trained to question and reflect on their science understandings. It has been suggested that girls may have more problems with misconceptions than do boys. In keeping with the constructivist ideas as to what constitutes an effective way to teach science (Burke, 1995; Lorsbach & Tobin, 2000) this study explored the ability of students to understand theoretical and conceptual principles of science. The data for this study was obtained using the methodology of a multiple choice survey which contains common misconceptions and the correct answers as choices. This survey was administered to eighth grade students in a large suburban school district by their science teachers. Interviews of a randomly selected sample group of 20 (10 boys and 10 girls) were conducted by the researcher. The results of the study used a t-test to compare boys and girls to see if there was a significant difference in type and/or number of science misconceptions. A matrix of possible answers to the survey was used to analyze the results of the interviews. There was a statistically significant difference between the means for the two groups, indicating a gender difference in knowledge of astronomy concepts. The result of the interviews also showed a difference in astronomy knowledge and background information. In addition the interviews showed that girls were very unsure of their answers while boys defended their answers even when they were incorrect.
Affiliation:
WIDENER UNIVERSITY
Issue Date:
2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/607873
Submitted date:
2015-09-29
Document Source:
Dissertation/Thesis
Language:
English Paper
Type Of Resource:
Empirical Research
Empirical Methodology:
Quantitative
Learning Environment:
Formal
Subjects:
Middle/Secondary School
Construct:
Content Knowledge Affective Belief/Identity Motivation/Attitude General Teaching Strategies
Content:
General/Broad Knowledge of Astronomy Content
Specific Interests:
Gender & Sex
Nation:
USA
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGray, Pamela A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T08:56:50Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-04T08:56:50Zen
dc.date.issued2006en
dc.date.submitted2015-09-29en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/607873en
dc.description.abstractThe intent of this study was to examine the relationship between gender and science misconceptions at the eighth grade level. This study attempted to ascertain if there are significant differences between genders in the number and types of science misconceptions eighth grade science students have. The specific misconceptions used in this investigation concern gravity, seasons, and phases of the moon. It remains a serious problem in science education that girls are being inadequately trained to question and reflect on their science understandings. It has been suggested that girls may have more problems with misconceptions than do boys. In keeping with the constructivist ideas as to what constitutes an effective way to teach science (Burke, 1995; Lorsbach & Tobin, 2000) this study explored the ability of students to understand theoretical and conceptual principles of science. The data for this study was obtained using the methodology of a multiple choice survey which contains common misconceptions and the correct answers as choices. This survey was administered to eighth grade students in a large suburban school district by their science teachers. Interviews of a randomly selected sample group of 20 (10 boys and 10 girls) were conducted by the researcher. The results of the study used a t-test to compare boys and girls to see if there was a significant difference in type and/or number of science misconceptions. A matrix of possible answers to the survey was used to analyze the results of the interviews. There was a statistically significant difference between the means for the two groups, indicating a gender difference in knowledge of astronomy concepts. The result of the interviews also showed a difference in astronomy knowledge and background information. In addition the interviews showed that girls were very unsure of their answers while boys defended their answers even when they were incorrect.en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-05-04T08:56:50Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 1c2e9f7c-26c6-4987-b70c-87acbc94dca0.pdf: 2702112 bytes, checksum: 6636b1cee0e25aa96fe69f26f642c87c (MD5) Previous issue date: 2006en
dc.language.isoEnglish Paperen
dc.titleGENDER DIFFERENCES IN SCIENCE MISCONCEPTIONS IN EIGHTH GRADE ASTRONOMYen
dc.typeDissertation/Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentWIDENER UNIVERSITYen
dc.type.resourceEmpirical Researchen
dc.istar.learningenvironmentFormalen
dc.istar.constructContent Knowledge Affective Belief/Identity Motivation/Attitude General Teaching Strategiesen
dc.istar.contentGeneral/Broad Knowledge of Astronomy Contenten
dc.istar.specificinterestsGender & Sexen
dc.istar.nationUSAen
dc.istar.empiricalmethodologyQuantitativeen
dc.istar.subjectMiddle/Secondary Schoolen
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