2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/607883
Title:
Musica mundane from Boethius to Keith Jarrett
Authors:
Gifford, William Tell
Abstract:
Boethius’s theory of musica mundana connects music to astronomy in the way both harmonize diverse elements. Chapter One begins by examining Pythagoras who recognized mathematical similarities between planetary motion and musical tuning; an explanation of Cicero follows, who added government as a third parallel. Boethius is reprised as a bridge between these ideas and later theories synthesizing cosmic and divine influence. Chapters Two and Three interrogate Handel and Keith Jarrett respectively as case studies to test for the possibility of influence in their work. Despite claims of stellar or religious connections for Handel, he fails the test when it comes to any kind of transcendent influence. Jarrett champions his own “tapping” of sources which, whether true or not, contributes to the systematic wholeness of his musicianship. The Conclusion invites a musica mundana “effect” based on coincidences between macrocosms and microcosms yet requiring no communication between them.
Affiliation:
University of Nevada
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/607883
Submitted date:
2015-09-29
Document Source:
Dissertation/Thesis
Language:
English Paper
Type Of Resource:
Theoretical Research
Empirical Methodology:
Qualitative
Subjects:
Multi-aged Groups
Construct:
Affective Belief/Identity Motivation/Attitude Nature of Science
Content:
Music
Nation:
USA
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGifford, William Tellen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T08:57:03Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-04T08:57:03Zen
dc.date.issued2004en
dc.date.submitted2015-09-29en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/607883en
dc.description.abstractBoethius’s theory of musica mundana connects music to astronomy in the way both harmonize diverse elements. Chapter One begins by examining Pythagoras who recognized mathematical similarities between planetary motion and musical tuning; an explanation of Cicero follows, who added government as a third parallel. Boethius is reprised as a bridge between these ideas and later theories synthesizing cosmic and divine influence. Chapters Two and Three interrogate Handel and Keith Jarrett respectively as case studies to test for the possibility of influence in their work. Despite claims of stellar or religious connections for Handel, he fails the test when it comes to any kind of transcendent influence. Jarrett champions his own “tapping” of sources which, whether true or not, contributes to the systematic wholeness of his musicianship. The Conclusion invites a musica mundana “effect” based on coincidences between macrocosms and microcosms yet requiring no communication between them.en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-05-04T08:57:03Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 65e04b91-d650-4f4d-a8bf-d93647bef225.pdf: 2113929 bytes, checksum: fa1afe20b9808a569bd9fdd1b5f62598 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2004en
dc.language.isoEnglish Paperen
dc.titleMusica mundane from Boethius to Keith Jarretten
dc.typeDissertation/Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Nevadaen
dc.type.resourceTheoretical Researchen
dc.istar.constructAffective Belief/Identity Motivation/Attitude Nature of Scienceen
dc.istar.contentMusicen
dc.istar.nationUSAen
dc.istar.empiricalmethodologyQualitativeen
dc.istar.subjectMulti-aged Groupsen
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