INTRODUCING ASTRONOMY INTO HIGH SCHOOL PHYSICS CURRICULUM THROUGH THE USE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA OBSERVATORY

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/607916
Title:
INTRODUCING ASTRONOMY INTO HIGH SCHOOL PHYSICS CURRICULUM THROUGH THE USE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA OBSERVATORY
Authors:
Nolby, Caitlin Marie
Abstract:
Astronomy education is currently lacking in the secondary level classroom. Many programs have been created to remedy this, including research opportunities for students and training workshops for educators. These reach only a small fraction of the population however, while remaining students still lack the opportunity to learn astronomy at the secondary level. This research addresses the creation of a program that will make astronomy education a recurring option for students across North Dakota through implementation of a two-week astronomy course at Grand Forks Central High School (GFCHS) in a class of 19 physics students. During ten class periods from April 16, 2012 through April 27, 2012, instruction included presentation of basic astronomy concepts and observational techniques as well as student participation in demonstrations and in-class activities. Original lesson plans also included a group research project on the astrometry of an asteroid. Students were given the option to visit the University of North Dakota (UND) Observatory the evening of April 20, 2012 for a public "star party" where they received a tour of the university's telescopes and research equipment. Students also took a field trip to the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences to tour Aviation and Space Studies facilities at UND on April 25, 2012. Students were given a pre-test at the start of the course, daily exit surveys at the end of each class period, and a post-test at the end of the two weeks. These assessments were used to evaluate student enjoyment, progress, and overall perception of the course. The research also identified common misconceptions in astronomy held by the learners and the most effective teaching methods. It was found that this course was overall successful in promoting the students' learning of astronomy. This analysis has been used to make improvements in future installments of the course and it is now available online to educators for use in the classroom.
Affiliation:
University of North Dakota
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/607916
Submitted date:
2015-09-29
Document Source:
Dissertation/Thesis
Language:
English Paper
Type Of Resource:
Empirical Research
Empirical Methodology:
Mixed Methods
Learning Environment:
Formal
Subjects:
Middle/Secondary School
Construct:
Affective Belief/Identity Motivation/Attitude General Teaching Strategies
Nation:
USA
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNolby, Caitlin Marieen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T08:57:49Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-04T08:57:49Zen
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.date.submitted2015-09-29en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/607916en
dc.description.abstractAstronomy education is currently lacking in the secondary level classroom. Many programs have been created to remedy this, including research opportunities for students and training workshops for educators. These reach only a small fraction of the population however, while remaining students still lack the opportunity to learn astronomy at the secondary level. This research addresses the creation of a program that will make astronomy education a recurring option for students across North Dakota through implementation of a two-week astronomy course at Grand Forks Central High School (GFCHS) in a class of 19 physics students. During ten class periods from April 16, 2012 through April 27, 2012, instruction included presentation of basic astronomy concepts and observational techniques as well as student participation in demonstrations and in-class activities. Original lesson plans also included a group research project on the astrometry of an asteroid. Students were given the option to visit the University of North Dakota (UND) Observatory the evening of April 20, 2012 for a public "star party" where they received a tour of the university's telescopes and research equipment. Students also took a field trip to the John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences to tour Aviation and Space Studies facilities at UND on April 25, 2012. Students were given a pre-test at the start of the course, daily exit surveys at the end of each class period, and a post-test at the end of the two weeks. These assessments were used to evaluate student enjoyment, progress, and overall perception of the course. The research also identified common misconceptions in astronomy held by the learners and the most effective teaching methods. It was found that this course was overall successful in promoting the students' learning of astronomy. This analysis has been used to make improvements in future installments of the course and it is now available online to educators for use in the classroom.en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-05-04T08:57:49Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 6ef38605-7dd6-4fe4-aef4-27ca3c12ac30.pdf: 3014304 bytes, checksum: b67dc9db4e630692eda02a52f666ffb2 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2012en
dc.language.isoEnglish Paperen
dc.titleINTRODUCING ASTRONOMY INTO HIGH SCHOOL PHYSICS CURRICULUM THROUGH THE USE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA OBSERVATORYen
dc.typeDissertation/Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of North Dakotaen
dc.type.resourceEmpirical Researchen
dc.istar.learningenvironmentFormalen
dc.istar.constructAffective Belief/Identity Motivation/Attitude General Teaching Strategiesen
dc.istar.nationUSAen
dc.istar.empiricalmethodologyMixed Methodsen
dc.istar.subjectMiddle/Secondary Schoolen
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