THE EFFICACY OF PLANETARIUM EXPERIENCES TO TEACH SPECIFIC SCIENCE CONCEPTS

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/607926
Title:
THE EFFICACY OF PLANETARIUM EXPERIENCES TO TEACH SPECIFIC SCIENCE CONCEPTS
Authors:
Palmer, Joel C.
Abstract:
The purpose o f this study was to examine the impact o f planetarium experiences on students’ understanding of phases of the moon and eclipses. This research employed a quasi-experimental design. Students from 12 classes in four different schools all in the same school district participated in the study. A total of 178 students from four teachers participated in the study. Data were collected using a researcher developed pretest and posttest. All students received classroom instruction based on the school district’s curriculum. The experimental groups took the posttest after attending a 45-minute planetarium experience titled Moon Witch. The control groups took the posttest before attending the planetarium experience but after receiving an additional 45-minute lesson on phases o f the moon and eclipses. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). An Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was run to determine if there was variance among teachers' instructional practices. Since the results indicated there was no significant variance among teachers, the study sample was analyzed as a single group. An Independent Samples t Test for Means was run in SPSS for the study sample and each subgroup. Subgroups were African American, Hispanic, White, Male, Female, and Economically Disadvantaged. The results indicated that there was an improvement on mean gain scores for the experimental group over the control group for all students and each subgroup. The differences in mean gain scores were significantly higher for all students and for the African American, Female, and Economically Disadvantaged subgroups. An Independent Samples t Test for Means was run using SPSS for each of the three different sections o f the pretest and posttest. The results indicated that most o f the improvement was in Section 3. This section required students to manipulate photos of the phases of moon into correct order. This section required more spatial reasoning than Section 1, multiple-choice, or Section 2, essay. Results indicate that planetarium experiences improved students’ understanding of phases of the moon and eclipses. There was evidence that this improvement was facilitated by the planetarium’s ability to create visual representations that students would otherwise have to create mentally.
Affiliation:
Texas A&M University - Commerce
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/607926
Submitted date:
2015-09-28
Document Source:
Dissertation/Thesis
Language:
English Paper
Type Of Resource:
Empirical Research
Empirical Methodology:
Quantitative
Learning Environment:
Formal
Research Setting:
Planetarium
Subjects:
Middle/Secondary School
Construct:
Content Knowledge
Content:
Sun-Earth-Moon (includes Seasons and Lunar Phases)
Specific Interests:
Gender & Sex
Nation:
USA
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPalmer, Joel C.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T08:58:03Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-04T08:58:03Zen
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.date.submitted2015-09-28en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/607926en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose o f this study was to examine the impact o f planetarium experiences on students’ understanding of phases of the moon and eclipses. This research employed a quasi-experimental design. Students from 12 classes in four different schools all in the same school district participated in the study. A total of 178 students from four teachers participated in the study. Data were collected using a researcher developed pretest and posttest. All students received classroom instruction based on the school district’s curriculum. The experimental groups took the posttest after attending a 45-minute planetarium experience titled Moon Witch. The control groups took the posttest before attending the planetarium experience but after receiving an additional 45-minute lesson on phases o f the moon and eclipses. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). An Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) was run to determine if there was variance among teachers' instructional practices. Since the results indicated there was no significant variance among teachers, the study sample was analyzed as a single group. An Independent Samples t Test for Means was run in SPSS for the study sample and each subgroup. Subgroups were African American, Hispanic, White, Male, Female, and Economically Disadvantaged. The results indicated that there was an improvement on mean gain scores for the experimental group over the control group for all students and each subgroup. The differences in mean gain scores were significantly higher for all students and for the African American, Female, and Economically Disadvantaged subgroups. An Independent Samples t Test for Means was run using SPSS for each of the three different sections o f the pretest and posttest. The results indicated that most o f the improvement was in Section 3. This section required students to manipulate photos of the phases of moon into correct order. This section required more spatial reasoning than Section 1, multiple-choice, or Section 2, essay. Results indicate that planetarium experiences improved students’ understanding of phases of the moon and eclipses. There was evidence that this improvement was facilitated by the planetarium’s ability to create visual representations that students would otherwise have to create mentally.en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-05-04T08:58:03Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 af12f170-dbf4-45dd-8bbc-f56ebebfc22f.pdf: 2255893 bytes, checksum: 61f2e654154bf91e2d07880c994530ae (MD5) Previous issue date: 2007en
dc.language.isoEnglish Paperen
dc.titleTHE EFFICACY OF PLANETARIUM EXPERIENCES TO TEACH SPECIFIC SCIENCE CONCEPTSen
dc.typeDissertation/Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentTexas A&M University - Commerceen
dc.type.resourceEmpirical Researchen
dc.istar.learningenvironmentFormalen
dc.istar.constructContent Knowledgeen
dc.istar.contentSun-Earth-Moon (includes Seasons and Lunar Phases)en
dc.istar.specificinterestsGender & Sexen
dc.istar.nationUSAen
dc.istar.empiricalmethodologyQuantitativeen
dc.istar.researchsettingPlanetariumen
dc.istar.subjectMiddle/Secondary Schoolen
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