Student Views on Science and Scientific Process: Studying Changes Made in A Redesigned Non-Major Introductory Science Course

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/607939
Title:
Student Views on Science and Scientific Process: Studying Changes Made in A Redesigned Non-Major Introductory Science Course
Authors:
Price, Matthew F.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to understand how instruction in an introductory non- major astronomy course at Oregon State University affects how non-science majors view science and the scientific process. The study used research-based methods to design a reform-based lecture/lab course and implement it for students. Two top-level questions were asked during the study of the redesigned astronomy course: 1. Do student epistemologies change after instruction using the redesigned lecture/lab curriculum in a non-major introductory astronomy course? 2. Is there any change in content gain when students are instructed using the redesigned non-major introductory astronomy course? Students were given pre-instruction and post-instruction epistemological measures in order to track changes in their views on science. A pre-instruction diagnostic test was given to gauge general knowledge, and examination scores were used to assess student content gain. An initial study of student epistemologies in 2004 indicated a significant decrease in the sophistication of student epistemologies after taking the astronomy course. After our instruction, student epistemologies do not show the decrease that we found initially and in some aspects show a modest increase in sophistication. We also found no significant decrease in student content gain after instruction was redeveloped to focus on epistemological instruction. In general, as instruction became more epistemologically focused, we found an increase in exam averages over the course of study. We found a correlation between our instruction and changes in student views about science and the scientific process, but also found content gain to increase.
Affiliation:
Oregon State University
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/607939
Submitted date:
2015-09-28
Document Source:
Dissertation/Thesis
Language:
English Paper
Type Of Resource:
Empirical Research
Empirical Methodology:
Quantitative
Learning Environment:
Formal
Subjects:
College Students
Construct:
Content Knowledge Nature of Science Epistemologies
Content:
General/Broad Knowledge of Astronomy Content
Nation:
USA
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Matthew F.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T08:58:20Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-04T08:58:20Zen
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.date.submitted2015-09-28en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/607939en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to understand how instruction in an introductory non- major astronomy course at Oregon State University affects how non-science majors view science and the scientific process. The study used research-based methods to design a reform-based lecture/lab course and implement it for students. Two top-level questions were asked during the study of the redesigned astronomy course: 1. Do student epistemologies change after instruction using the redesigned lecture/lab curriculum in a non-major introductory astronomy course? 2. Is there any change in content gain when students are instructed using the redesigned non-major introductory astronomy course? Students were given pre-instruction and post-instruction epistemological measures in order to track changes in their views on science. A pre-instruction diagnostic test was given to gauge general knowledge, and examination scores were used to assess student content gain. An initial study of student epistemologies in 2004 indicated a significant decrease in the sophistication of student epistemologies after taking the astronomy course. After our instruction, student epistemologies do not show the decrease that we found initially and in some aspects show a modest increase in sophistication. We also found no significant decrease in student content gain after instruction was redeveloped to focus on epistemological instruction. In general, as instruction became more epistemologically focused, we found an increase in exam averages over the course of study. We found a correlation between our instruction and changes in student views about science and the scientific process, but also found content gain to increase.en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-05-04T08:58:20Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 d59ad0d8-0f78-4012-825b-4ae70e5647a2.pdf: 1086791 bytes, checksum: 5e01dc947ec3b67386355ec234cf872d (MD5) Previous issue date: 2008en
dc.language.isoEnglish Paperen
dc.titleStudent Views on Science and Scientific Process: Studying Changes Made in A Redesigned Non-Major Introductory Science Courseen
dc.typeDissertation/Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentOregon State Universityen
dc.type.resourceEmpirical Researchen
dc.istar.learningenvironmentFormalen
dc.istar.constructContent Knowledge Nature of Science Epistemologiesen
dc.istar.contentGeneral/Broad Knowledge of Astronomy Contenten
dc.istar.nationUSAen
dc.istar.empiricalmethodologyQuantitativeen
dc.istar.subjectCollege Studentsen
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