2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/607966
Title:
Conceptions of Scale and Scaling: The Expert-Novice Continuum
Authors:
Tretter, Thomas R.
Abstract:
Science education reform recommendations include incorporation o f big, overarching themes in K-12 science to reduce curricular fragmentation. One recommended unifying theme is scaling, but there appears to be a gap in the research literature on educators’ knowledge o f how students think about size and scale. This research investigated students’ conceptions of size and scale across a continuum from grade («=37), 7*’ grade («=71), 9*'’ grade («=59), 12*^ grade academically gifted («=38), to experts («=10). Results showed that relative sizes of objects were more accurately conceptualized than absolute sizes for all groups. Objects that serve as size reference points were identified along with experiences that impact conceptions of scale. The size of a person was a major referencepointforallgroups. Therewerevaryingnumbersofconceptuallydistinctsize categories for each group, with the expert group possessing more distinct as well as more clearly defined categories, particularly at scales smaller than a person. Objects larger than a person were categorized into size groupings based on the nature of experiences with those sizes - visual or kinesthetic, wholistic or sequential. An asymmetry between conceptualizations of large and small scale was identified. At scales larger than a person, conceptualizations degraded uniformly as the size increased, but at small scale this degradation occurred in a discontinuous manner at the boundary where objects become invisible to the unaided eye. Experts mentally maneuvered across this discontinuity by conceptually jumping to a new scale world, using mathematics and various units o f measurement to provide resilient links between microscopic and macroscopic worlds. This research concludes with implications for teachers, parents, and curriculum developers to help students make better use of scaling concepts as a broad, unifying theme to create coherence in the science curriculum.
Affiliation:
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/607966
Submitted date:
2015-09-25
Document Source:
Dissertation/Thesis
Language:
English Paper
Type Of Resource:
Empirical Research
Empirical Methodology:
Mixed Methods
Learning Environment:
Formal
Subjects:
Middle/Secondary School
Construct:
Content Knowledge Spatial Reasoning
Content:
Scale & Structure
Nation:
USA
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTretter, Thomas R.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T08:58:59Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-04T08:58:59Zen
dc.date.issued2004en
dc.date.submitted2015-09-25en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/607966en
dc.description.abstractScience education reform recommendations include incorporation o f big, overarching themes in K-12 science to reduce curricular fragmentation. One recommended unifying theme is scaling, but there appears to be a gap in the research literature on educators’ knowledge o f how students think about size and scale. This research investigated students’ conceptions of size and scale across a continuum from grade («=37), 7*’ grade («=71), 9*'’ grade («=59), 12*^ grade academically gifted («=38), to experts («=10). Results showed that relative sizes of objects were more accurately conceptualized than absolute sizes for all groups. Objects that serve as size reference points were identified along with experiences that impact conceptions of scale. The size of a person was a major referencepointforallgroups. Therewerevaryingnumbersofconceptuallydistinctsize categories for each group, with the expert group possessing more distinct as well as more clearly defined categories, particularly at scales smaller than a person. Objects larger than a person were categorized into size groupings based on the nature of experiences with those sizes - visual or kinesthetic, wholistic or sequential. An asymmetry between conceptualizations of large and small scale was identified. At scales larger than a person, conceptualizations degraded uniformly as the size increased, but at small scale this degradation occurred in a discontinuous manner at the boundary where objects become invisible to the unaided eye. Experts mentally maneuvered across this discontinuity by conceptually jumping to a new scale world, using mathematics and various units o f measurement to provide resilient links between microscopic and macroscopic worlds. This research concludes with implications for teachers, parents, and curriculum developers to help students make better use of scaling concepts as a broad, unifying theme to create coherence in the science curriculum.en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-05-04T08:58:59Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 2b1a05d7-d13f-4125-ae15-bec47699bf0a.pdf: 5176499 bytes, checksum: 1ca4ce7c81272c1c46a6c384f6065acb (MD5) Previous issue date: 2004en
dc.language.isoEnglish Paperen
dc.titleConceptions of Scale and Scaling: The Expert-Novice Continuumen
dc.typeDissertation/Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of North Carolina, Chapel Hillen
dc.type.resourceEmpirical Researchen
dc.istar.learningenvironmentFormalen
dc.istar.constructContent Knowledge Spatial Reasoningen
dc.istar.contentScale & Structureen
dc.istar.nationUSAen
dc.istar.empiricalmethodologyMixed Methodsen
dc.istar.subjectMiddle/Secondary Schoolen
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