2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/608014
Title:
Stellar photometry for the Shared Skies Partnership
Authors:
Monsour, Jason
Abstract:
This thesis forms a feasibility study into the use of remotely operable telescopes at Mount Kent Observatory in Australia and Moore Observatory in the USA for precision stellar photometry by distance education students, for an initiative called the Shared Skies partnership. The thesis introduces stellar activity and exoplanet science as motivations for stellar photometry and the use of remotely operable telescopes for education through research. Methods for stellar photometry are reviewed as are the technical details of the telescopes at Mt Kent and Moore Observatories. Light curve results of standard stars, spotted stars and an exoplanet transit are presented. Discussion of these results is made, and suggestions offered regarding the use of pipeline processing software and robotic operation of the telescopes as future developments. It is concluded that scientifically useful stellar photometry can be obtained using remotely operable telescopes at Mount Kent and Moore Observatories but general use must await the implementation of robust robotic telescope operation and pipeline processing of data to avoid the downloading of large amounts of raw data over the internet.
Affiliation:
University of Southern Queensland
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/608014
Submitted date:
2016-02-29
Document Source:
Dissertation/Thesis
Language:
English Abstract Only
Type Of Resource:
Curriculum/Program Report or Description
Learning Environment:
Informal
Research Setting:
Research Facility
Construct:
Scientific Inquiry
Content:
Stars
Specific Interests:
remote observatory
Nation:
Australia
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMonsour, Jasonen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T09:00:05Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-04T09:00:05Zen
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.date.submitted2016-02-29en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/608014en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis forms a feasibility study into the use of remotely operable telescopes at Mount Kent Observatory in Australia and Moore Observatory in the USA for precision stellar photometry by distance education students, for an initiative called the Shared Skies partnership. The thesis introduces stellar activity and exoplanet science as motivations for stellar photometry and the use of remotely operable telescopes for education through research. Methods for stellar photometry are reviewed as are the technical details of the telescopes at Mt Kent and Moore Observatories. Light curve results of standard stars, spotted stars and an exoplanet transit are presented. Discussion of these results is made, and suggestions offered regarding the use of pipeline processing software and robotic operation of the telescopes as future developments. It is concluded that scientifically useful stellar photometry can be obtained using remotely operable telescopes at Mount Kent and Moore Observatories but general use must await the implementation of robust robotic telescope operation and pipeline processing of data to avoid the downloading of large amounts of raw data over the internet.en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-05-04T09:00:05Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 d93a5b5a-e181-425b-87de-dbbc9902bca8.pdf: 3492923 bytes, checksum: 800a4e5981f57a96c16ca59c0d1c5cf4 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2010en
dc.language.isoEnglish Abstract Onlyen
dc.titleStellar photometry for the Shared Skies Partnershipen
dc.typeDissertation/Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Southern Queenslanden
dc.type.resourceCurriculum/Program Report or Descriptionen
dc.istar.learningenvironmentInformalen
dc.istar.constructScientific Inquiryen
dc.istar.contentStarsen
dc.istar.specificinterestsremote observatoryen
dc.istar.nationAustraliaen
dc.istar.researchsettingResearch Facilityen
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