PERCEIVED IMPACT ON STUDENT ENGAGEMENT WHEN LEARNING MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE IN AN OUTDOOR SETTING

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/608022
Title:
PERCEIVED IMPACT ON STUDENT ENGAGEMENT WHEN LEARNING MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE IN AN OUTDOOR SETTING
Authors:
Abbatiello, James
Abstract:
Human beings have an innate need to spend time outside, but in recent years children are spending less time outdoors. It is possible that this decline in time spent outdoors could have a negative impact on child development. Science teachers can combat the decline in the amount of time children spend outside by taking their science classes outdoors for regular classroom instruction. This study identified the potential impacts that learning in an outdoor setting might have on student engagement when learning middle school science. One sixth-grade middle school class participated in this case study, and students participated in outdoor intervention lessons where the instructional environment was a courtyard on the middle school campus. The outdoor lessons consisted of the same objectives and content as lessons delivered in an indoor setting during a middle school astronomy unit. Multiple sources of data were collected including questionnaires after each lesson, a focus group, student work samples, and researcher observations. The data was triangulated, and a vignette was written about the class’ experiences learning in an outdoor setting. This study found that the feeling of autonomy and freedom gained by learning in an outdoor setting, and the novelty of the outdoor environment did increase student engagement for learning middle school science. In addition, as a result of this study, more work is needed to identify how peer to peer relationships are impacted by learning outdoors, how teachers could best utilize the outdoor setting for regular science instruction, and how learning in an outdoor setting might impact a feeling of stewardship for the environment in young adults.
Affiliation:
Northeastern University
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/608022
Submitted date:
2015-09-24
Document Source:
Dissertation/Thesis
Language:
English Paper
Type Of Resource:
Empirical Research
Empirical Methodology:
Qualitative
Learning Environment:
Formal
Subjects:
Middle/Secondary School
Construct:
Affective Belief/Identity Motivation/Attitude
Nation:
USA
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAbbatiello, Jamesen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T09:00:17Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-04T09:00:17Zen
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.date.submitted2015-09-24en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/608022en
dc.description.abstractHuman beings have an innate need to spend time outside, but in recent years children are spending less time outdoors. It is possible that this decline in time spent outdoors could have a negative impact on child development. Science teachers can combat the decline in the amount of time children spend outside by taking their science classes outdoors for regular classroom instruction. This study identified the potential impacts that learning in an outdoor setting might have on student engagement when learning middle school science. One sixth-grade middle school class participated in this case study, and students participated in outdoor intervention lessons where the instructional environment was a courtyard on the middle school campus. The outdoor lessons consisted of the same objectives and content as lessons delivered in an indoor setting during a middle school astronomy unit. Multiple sources of data were collected including questionnaires after each lesson, a focus group, student work samples, and researcher observations. The data was triangulated, and a vignette was written about the class’ experiences learning in an outdoor setting. This study found that the feeling of autonomy and freedom gained by learning in an outdoor setting, and the novelty of the outdoor environment did increase student engagement for learning middle school science. In addition, as a result of this study, more work is needed to identify how peer to peer relationships are impacted by learning outdoors, how teachers could best utilize the outdoor setting for regular science instruction, and how learning in an outdoor setting might impact a feeling of stewardship for the environment in young adults.en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-05-04T09:00:17Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 03767d6e-9b4f-4653-870b-f5f60916de20.pdf: 1922947 bytes, checksum: d843bee87ddc655d2d9ec4ab582115e6 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2013en
dc.language.isoEnglish Paperen
dc.titlePERCEIVED IMPACT ON STUDENT ENGAGEMENT WHEN LEARNING MIDDLE SCHOOL SCIENCE IN AN OUTDOOR SETTINGen
dc.typeDissertation/Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentNortheastern Universityen
dc.type.resourceEmpirical Researchen
dc.istar.learningenvironmentFormalen
dc.istar.constructAffective Belief/Identity Motivation/Attitudeen
dc.istar.nationUSAen
dc.istar.empiricalmethodologyQualitativeen
dc.istar.subjectMiddle/Secondary Schoolen
All Items in International Studies of Astronomy Education Research Database are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.