2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/608040
Title:
Astronomy for the elementary school teacher.
Authors:
Branley, Franklyn M
Abstract:
"Sparked by the inspiration of enthusiastic leaders, such as Wilbur S. Jackman and Liberty Hyde Bailey, science in childhood education has made gigantic strides. Today, highly capable educators are turning their efforts to the advancement of the cause, for they realize that an integral part of the education of young people involves acquaintance with, and understanding of, the physical and biological environment. They also appreciate that when the proper approach is used science is uniquely fitted to develop attitudes that reflect good judgment and considered opinions, omnipresent goals of education. The people who are spearheading the advancement of science in elementary education desire that all teachers become acquainted with the potentialities of science, and with the various approaches to science that can be made in the classroom. It is hoped that this project serves in some small way to present ideas which might prove beneficial to teachers and students. There is no one way of working with children on the topic of astronomy. Techniques and procedures that may be effective in one situation may not be called for in another. Children are vastly different, as indeed are classroom situations. Some groups of children may be thrilled by a story narrated by the teacher. At other times, the same group may be bored by a teacher-told story. Other children may find enjoyment in a contented atmosphere where they are able to read books selected by themselves. And yet, there may be occasions when these same youngsters would so much prefer to sit back and listen. Teaching is a dynamic enterprise involving a veritable storehouse of techniques and procedures. The skillful teacher is one who knows many approaches to children, and who is able to sense the subtle nuances of behavior and response which should serve as guides in directing children most effectively in any particular situation. This project is not a complete offering of materials or procedures for teaching astronomy in the elementary school. It presents only a few viewpoints, some of which the reader may find useful in his own situation. The major goal was to present a compilation of activities and resources which can be adapted for use in most any classroom, regardless of physical facilities. But here again, the activities and resources are not exhaustive. They are merely suggestive of the possibilities. Teaching is a creative undertaking, and so the writer knows that teachers will not feel hampered or restricted by the suggestions presented here. As mentioned earlier, the wish of the writer is that this paper will. 1. Offer teachers some suggested techniques they may wish to try for themselves. 2. Help teachers see how facts become interesting when they are fitted into a larger framework. 3. Help teachers see that complex ideas can be understood more clearly when they are illustrated concretely. 4. Help teachers discover and appreciate the potentialities of youngsters to find out for themselves. 5. Acquaint teachers with texts, with books for children, films, and other materials that are available. 6. Acquaint teachers with many of the facts of astronomy in a stimulating manner. If the reader of this project gains an idea that sparks thinking, and which enables him to do a more satisfying job in the classroom, the writer will feel that his efforts have been most worthwhile."
Affiliation:
Columbia University
Issue Date:
1957
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/608040
Submitted date:
2016-02-29
Document Source:
Dissertation/Thesis
Language:
English Abstract Only
Type Of Resource:
Curriculum/Program Report or Description
Learning Environment:
Formal
Subjects:
Elementary Students
Content:
General/Broad Knowledge of Astronomy Content
Nation:
USA
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBranley, Franklyn Men
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T09:00:35Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-04T09:00:35Zen
dc.date.issued1957en
dc.date.submitted2016-02-29en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/608040en
dc.description.abstract"Sparked by the inspiration of enthusiastic leaders, such as Wilbur S. Jackman and Liberty Hyde Bailey, science in childhood education has made gigantic strides. Today, highly capable educators are turning their efforts to the advancement of the cause, for they realize that an integral part of the education of young people involves acquaintance with, and understanding of, the physical and biological environment. They also appreciate that when the proper approach is used science is uniquely fitted to develop attitudes that reflect good judgment and considered opinions, omnipresent goals of education. The people who are spearheading the advancement of science in elementary education desire that all teachers become acquainted with the potentialities of science, and with the various approaches to science that can be made in the classroom. It is hoped that this project serves in some small way to present ideas which might prove beneficial to teachers and students. There is no one way of working with children on the topic of astronomy. Techniques and procedures that may be effective in one situation may not be called for in another. Children are vastly different, as indeed are classroom situations. Some groups of children may be thrilled by a story narrated by the teacher. At other times, the same group may be bored by a teacher-told story. Other children may find enjoyment in a contented atmosphere where they are able to read books selected by themselves. And yet, there may be occasions when these same youngsters would so much prefer to sit back and listen. Teaching is a dynamic enterprise involving a veritable storehouse of techniques and procedures. The skillful teacher is one who knows many approaches to children, and who is able to sense the subtle nuances of behavior and response which should serve as guides in directing children most effectively in any particular situation. This project is not a complete offering of materials or procedures for teaching astronomy in the elementary school. It presents only a few viewpoints, some of which the reader may find useful in his own situation. The major goal was to present a compilation of activities and resources which can be adapted for use in most any classroom, regardless of physical facilities. But here again, the activities and resources are not exhaustive. They are merely suggestive of the possibilities. Teaching is a creative undertaking, and so the writer knows that teachers will not feel hampered or restricted by the suggestions presented here. As mentioned earlier, the wish of the writer is that this paper will. 1. Offer teachers some suggested techniques they may wish to try for themselves. 2. Help teachers see how facts become interesting when they are fitted into a larger framework. 3. Help teachers see that complex ideas can be understood more clearly when they are illustrated concretely. 4. Help teachers discover and appreciate the potentialities of youngsters to find out for themselves. 5. Acquaint teachers with texts, with books for children, films, and other materials that are available. 6. Acquaint teachers with many of the facts of astronomy in a stimulating manner. If the reader of this project gains an idea that sparks thinking, and which enables him to do a more satisfying job in the classroom, the writer will feel that his efforts have been most worthwhile."en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-05-04T09:00:35Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 1957en
dc.language.isoEnglish Abstract Onlyen
dc.titleAstronomy for the elementary school teacher.en
dc.typeDissertation/Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentColumbia Universityen
dc.type.resourceCurriculum/Program Report or Descriptionen
dc.istar.learningenvironmentFormalen
dc.istar.contentGeneral/Broad Knowledge of Astronomy Contenten
dc.istar.nationUSAen
dc.istar.subjectElementary Studentsen
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