2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/608046
Title:
Changing children's astronomical ideas
Authors:
Dunlop, John Alexander
Abstract:
Children attending planetarium programmes at Auckland Observatory were surveyed about their views on the Earth-Moon-Sun system before and after a visit. The effect of teaching on these ideas was significant. Patterns of misconceptions observed were generally similar to those in other studies. Some unusual misconceptions not previously reported were found, for example two children had the earth orbiting the Sun then the Moon each day and night in a figure eight pattern. Evidence is presented which indicates that most children, even after several years of schooling, hold views that are at variance with accepted facts about the Earth - Moon - Sun system. Previous research into methods for improving the effectiveness of learning and teaching about astronomy is reviewed. The study demonstrates that misconceptions often persist despite correct explanations being taught. It suggests that teaching may introduce incorrect ideas from the teacher's own misconceptions and from the use of misleading diagrams and models. Evidence is presented that multiple choice based assessment may undervalue younger children's knowledge. Suggestions are made on methods of using children's drawings to survey their ideas and encourage meaningful learning, which takes into account the realities of the classroom.
Affiliation:
University of Auckland
Issue Date:
1999
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/608046
Submitted date:
2016-02-29
Document Source:
Dissertation/Thesis
Language:
English Abstract Only
Type Of Resource:
Empirical Research
Empirical Methodology:
Mixed Methods
Learning Environment:
Formal
Research Setting:
Planetarium
Subjects:
Elementary Students
Construct:
Content Knowledge
Content:
Sun-Earth-Moon (includes Seasons and Lunar Phases)
Nation:
USA
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDunlop, John Alexanderen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T09:00:45Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-04T09:00:45Zen
dc.date.issued1999en
dc.date.submitted2016-02-29en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/608046en
dc.description.abstractChildren attending planetarium programmes at Auckland Observatory were surveyed about their views on the Earth-Moon-Sun system before and after a visit. The effect of teaching on these ideas was significant. Patterns of misconceptions observed were generally similar to those in other studies. Some unusual misconceptions not previously reported were found, for example two children had the earth orbiting the Sun then the Moon each day and night in a figure eight pattern. Evidence is presented which indicates that most children, even after several years of schooling, hold views that are at variance with accepted facts about the Earth - Moon - Sun system. Previous research into methods for improving the effectiveness of learning and teaching about astronomy is reviewed. The study demonstrates that misconceptions often persist despite correct explanations being taught. It suggests that teaching may introduce incorrect ideas from the teacher's own misconceptions and from the use of misleading diagrams and models. Evidence is presented that multiple choice based assessment may undervalue younger children's knowledge. Suggestions are made on methods of using children's drawings to survey their ideas and encourage meaningful learning, which takes into account the realities of the classroom.en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-05-04T09:00:45Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 1999en
dc.language.isoEnglish Abstract Onlyen
dc.titleChanging children's astronomical ideasen
dc.typeDissertation/Thesisen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Aucklanden
dc.type.resourceEmpirical Researchen
dc.istar.learningenvironmentFormalen
dc.istar.constructContent Knowledgeen
dc.istar.contentSun-Earth-Moon (includes Seasons and Lunar Phases)en
dc.istar.nationUSAen
dc.istar.empiricalmethodologyMixed Methodsen
dc.istar.researchsettingPlanetariumen
dc.istar.subjectElementary Studentsen
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