A Comparison of the Effectiveness of the Planetarium and the Classroom Chalkboard and Celestial Globe in the Teaching of Specific Astronomical

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/608182
Title:
A Comparison of the Effectiveness of the Planetarium and the Classroom Chalkboard and Celestial Globe in the Teaching of Specific Astronomical
Authors:
Reed, George; Campbell, James Reed
Abstract:
This study was undertaken because of the need to evaluate the effectiveness of the planetarium as a teaching device. Effectiveness for the purpose of this study was defined as the degree to which stated behavioral objectives were achieved. Since mental activity is not directly observable, it has to be represented by some sort of behavior that is observable. A behavioral objective is a desired outcome of learning that is observable. The formal research problem was: Is the planetarium a more effective teaching device than a combination of the classroom chalkboard and celestial globe in the teaching of selected astronomical concepts in terms of the immediate attainment and retention of specified cognitive behavioral objectives and the attainment of specified affective behavioral objectives? The planetarium teaching situation was compared to the class- room chalkboard and celestial globe teaching situation in the teaching of selected astronomical concepts. The classroom chalkboard and celestial globe teaching situation was chosen for comparison because it represented a standard adequately equipped teaching situation for the astronomical concepts involved. The astronomical concepts are the diurnal and yearly motions of stars, the superior planets and the sun, and the celestial sphere and precession. The null hypotheses were: 1. There is no difference in the attainment of the cognitive behavioral objectives between the two teaching situations as measured by the Selected Astronomical Principles Test. 2. There is no difference in the attainment of the affective behavioral objectives between the two teaching situations as measured by the Selected Astronomical Principles Test. The cognitive behavioral objectives are concerned with knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. The affective behavioral objectives are concerned with attitudes and appreciations. The Selected Astronomical Principles Test was developed because of the nonexistence of an available standardized test with regard to the content and stated objectives of the experiment. A jury of professional astronomers and planetarium directors established the content validity of the test. The reliability of the test was established by means of two pilot studies.
Affiliation:
West Chester State College; University of Pennsylvania (PA)
Journal:
School Science and Mathematics
Issue Date:
1-Jan-1972
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/608182
Submitted date:
2016-03-14
Document Source:
Peer Reviewed
Language:
English Paper
Type Of Resource:
Empirical Research
Empirical Methodology:
Quantitative
Learning Environment:
Formal
Research Setting:
Planetarium
Subjects:
College Students
Construct:
Content Knowledge Affective Belief/Identity Motivation/Attitude General Teaching Strategies
Content:
General/Broad Knowledge of Astronomy Content
Nation:
USA
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorReed, Georgeen
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, James Reeden
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T09:05:49Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-04T09:05:49Zen
dc.date.issued1972-01-01en
dc.date.submitted2016-03-14en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/608182en
dc.description.abstractThis study was undertaken because of the need to evaluate the effectiveness of the planetarium as a teaching device. Effectiveness for the purpose of this study was defined as the degree to which stated behavioral objectives were achieved. Since mental activity is not directly observable, it has to be represented by some sort of behavior that is observable. A behavioral objective is a desired outcome of learning that is observable. The formal research problem was: Is the planetarium a more effective teaching device than a combination of the classroom chalkboard and celestial globe in the teaching of selected astronomical concepts in terms of the immediate attainment and retention of specified cognitive behavioral objectives and the attainment of specified affective behavioral objectives? The planetarium teaching situation was compared to the class- room chalkboard and celestial globe teaching situation in the teaching of selected astronomical concepts. The classroom chalkboard and celestial globe teaching situation was chosen for comparison because it represented a standard adequately equipped teaching situation for the astronomical concepts involved. The astronomical concepts are the diurnal and yearly motions of stars, the superior planets and the sun, and the celestial sphere and precession. The null hypotheses were: 1. There is no difference in the attainment of the cognitive behavioral objectives between the two teaching situations as measured by the Selected Astronomical Principles Test. 2. There is no difference in the attainment of the affective behavioral objectives between the two teaching situations as measured by the Selected Astronomical Principles Test. The cognitive behavioral objectives are concerned with knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. The affective behavioral objectives are concerned with attitudes and appreciations. The Selected Astronomical Principles Test was developed because of the nonexistence of an available standardized test with regard to the content and stated objectives of the experiment. A jury of professional astronomers and planetarium directors established the content validity of the test. The reliability of the test was established by means of two pilot studies.en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-05-04T09:05:49Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 0b656cf4-729e-4faf-9716-c9f398d3651c.pdf: 439212 bytes, checksum: 1a6d395e5408a6effef4907f0ca00638 (MD5) Previous issue date: 1972-01-01en
dc.language.isoEnglish Paperen
dc.titleA Comparison of the Effectiveness of the Planetarium and the Classroom Chalkboard and Celestial Globe in the Teaching of Specific Astronomicalen
dc.typePeer Revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentWest Chester State Collegeen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Pennsylvania (PA)en
dc.identifier.journalSchool Science and Mathematicsen
dc.type.resourceEmpirical Researchen
dc.istar.learningenvironmentFormalen
dc.istar.constructContent Knowledge Affective Belief/Identity Motivation/Attitude General Teaching Strategiesen
dc.istar.contentGeneral/Broad Knowledge of Astronomy Contenten
dc.istar.nationUSAen
dc.istar.empiricalmethodologyQuantitativeen
dc.istar.researchsettingPlanetariumen
dc.istar.subjectCollege Studentsen
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