Early Elementary Students’ Development of Astronomy Concepts in the Planetarium

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/608189
Title:
Early Elementary Students’ Development of Astronomy Concepts in the Planetarium
Authors:
Plummer, Julia
Abstract:
The National Science Education Standards [National Research Council (1996) National science education standards. Washington, DC: National Academy Press] recommend that students understand the apparent patterns of motion of the sun, moon and stars by the end of early elementary school. However, little information exists on students’ ability to learn these concepts. This study examines the change in students’ understanding of apparent celestial motion after attending a planetarium program using kinesthetic learning techniques. Pre- and post-interviews were conducted with participants from seven classes of first and second grade students (N 1⁄4 63). Students showed significant improvement in knowledge of all areas of apparent celestial motion covered by the planetarium program. This suggests that students in early elementary school are capable of learning the accurate description of apparent celestial motion. The results also demonstrate the value of both kinesthetic learning techniques and the rich visual environment of the planetarium for improved understanding of celestial motion.
Affiliation:
Arcadia University (PA)
Journal:
Journal of Research in Science Teaching
Issue Date:
1-Jan-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/608189
Submitted date:
2016-03-14
Document Source:
Peer Reviewed
Language:
English Paper
Type Of Resource:
Empirical Research
Empirical Methodology:
Qualitative
Learning Environment:
Formal
Research Setting:
Planetarium
Subjects:
Elementary Students
Construct:
Content Knowledge General Teaching Strategies
Content:
Celestial Motion
Nation:
USA
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPlummer, Juliaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T09:05:58Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-04T09:05:58Zen
dc.date.issued2009-01-01en
dc.date.submitted2016-03-14en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/608189en
dc.description.abstractThe National Science Education Standards [National Research Council (1996) National science education standards. Washington, DC: National Academy Press] recommend that students understand the apparent patterns of motion of the sun, moon and stars by the end of early elementary school. However, little information exists on students’ ability to learn these concepts. This study examines the change in students’ understanding of apparent celestial motion after attending a planetarium program using kinesthetic learning techniques. Pre- and post-interviews were conducted with participants from seven classes of first and second grade students (N 1⁄4 63). Students showed significant improvement in knowledge of all areas of apparent celestial motion covered by the planetarium program. This suggests that students in early elementary school are capable of learning the accurate description of apparent celestial motion. The results also demonstrate the value of both kinesthetic learning techniques and the rich visual environment of the planetarium for improved understanding of celestial motion.en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-05-04T09:05:58Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 3e78f618-0cb0-47da-a2f8-f13788e350ba.pdf: 138985 bytes, checksum: bc8b38dbb06fa145ec13b8390e0083b8 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2009-01-01en
dc.language.isoEnglish Paperen
dc.titleEarly Elementary Students’ Development of Astronomy Concepts in the Planetariumen
dc.typePeer Revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentArcadia University (PA)en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Research in Science Teachingen
dc.type.resourceEmpirical Researchen
dc.istar.learningenvironmentFormalen
dc.istar.constructContent Knowledge General Teaching Strategiesen
dc.istar.contentCelestial Motionen
dc.istar.nationUSAen
dc.istar.empiricalmethodologyQualitativeen
dc.istar.researchsettingPlanetariumen
dc.istar.subjectElementary Studentsen
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