2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/617169
Title:
Resources for Responding to Doomsday 2012: An Annotated Guide
Authors:
Andrew, Fraknoi
Abstract:
Educators at all levels and in all settings are getting questions these days about the approaching “end of the world” catastrophes supposedly coming in December 2012. This resource guide provides a selection of useful resources for responding to student and public questions in this arena. The latest internet myth to gain traction is the notion that the world will experience a dire catastrophe on the winter solstice (December 21) 2012, either from collision with a (mythical) planet called Nibiru or from some other astronomical cause. A large number of books and web sites have touted this notion for a while, as have documentaries on the History Channel and other cable channels that should know better. In 2009, the producers of a major movie thriller, called “2012,” spent quite a bit of money on a huge advertising campaign that seared images of catastrophe in the public mind, even setting up a fake web site purporting to show the science behind the idea. As a result of all this media publicity, lots of people are worried and are asking astronomers about Doomsday 2012. David Morrison (at NASA Ames and the SETI Institute) has coined the term “cosmophobia” for the fear of astronomical disasters, and it appears that cosmophobia is significantly on the rise, despite the absence of any real evidence that 2012 will be a worse time for possibilities of cosmic disaster than any other year. Here are a few selected web and written resources that give clear answers to questions about the 2012 myth from the scientific and archaeological perspective.
Affiliation:
Foothill College
Citation:
Fraknoi, A. (2012). Resources for Responding to Doomsday 2012: An Annotated Guide. Astronomy Education Review, 11(1), 010301.
Journal:
Astronomy Education Review
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/617169
Document Source:
Peer-reviewed
Language:
en_US
Type Of Resource:
Resource Guide/Bibliography
Learning Environment:
Formal
Subjects:
n/a
Construct:
n/a; on
Content:
n/a
Nation:
Canada
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAndrew, Fraknoien
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-18T20:52:37Zen
dc.date.available2016-07-18T20:52:37Zen
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.citationFraknoi, A. (2012). Resources for Responding to Doomsday 2012: An Annotated Guide. Astronomy Education Review, 11(1), 010301.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/617169en
dc.description.abstractEducators at all levels and in all settings are getting questions these days about the approaching “end of the world” catastrophes supposedly coming in December 2012. This resource guide provides a selection of useful resources for responding to student and public questions in this arena. The latest internet myth to gain traction is the notion that the world will experience a dire catastrophe on the winter solstice (December 21) 2012, either from collision with a (mythical) planet called Nibiru or from some other astronomical cause. A large number of books and web sites have touted this notion for a while, as have documentaries on the History Channel and other cable channels that should know better. In 2009, the producers of a major movie thriller, called “2012,” spent quite a bit of money on a huge advertising campaign that seared images of catastrophe in the public mind, even setting up a fake web site purporting to show the science behind the idea. As a result of all this media publicity, lots of people are worried and are asking astronomers about Doomsday 2012. David Morrison (at NASA Ames and the SETI Institute) has coined the term “cosmophobia” for the fear of astronomical disasters, and it appears that cosmophobia is significantly on the rise, despite the absence of any real evidence that 2012 will be a worse time for possibilities of cosmic disaster than any other year. Here are a few selected web and written resources that give clear answers to questions about the 2012 myth from the scientific and archaeological perspective.en
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dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Coty Tatge (coty@caperteam.com) on 2016-07-18T20:52:37Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 FRAKNOIandrew_2012-b_AER.pdf: 60483 bytes, checksum: 1eacee6e093f1d6b5f86f54a04b4fd63 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-07-18T20:52:37Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 FRAKNOIandrew_2012-b_AER.pdf: 60483 bytes, checksum: 1eacee6e093f1d6b5f86f54a04b4fd63 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2012en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleResources for Responding to Doomsday 2012: An Annotated Guideen
dc.typePeer-revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentFoothill Collegeen
dc.identifier.journalAstronomy Education Reviewen
dc.type.resourceResource Guide/Bibliographyen
dc.istar.learningenvironmentFormalen
dc.istar.constructn/aen
dc.istar.constructonen
dc.istar.contentn/aen
dc.istar.nationCanadaen
dc.istar.subjectn/aen
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