Improving Student Attitudes about Learning Science and Student Scientific Reasoning Skills

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/617171
Title:
Improving Student Attitudes about Learning Science and Student Scientific Reasoning Skills
Authors:
Douglas, Duncan; Leilani, Arthurs
Abstract:
Student attitudes about learning science and student ideas about the nature of science were compared at the end of two astronomy courses taught in Fall 2007, a course with a traditional astronomy curriculum and a transformed course, whose traditional astronomy curriculum was supplemented by an embedded curriculum that explicitly addressed the nature of science and student metacognition (i.e., thinking about one’s own thinking.) The embedded curriculum in the transformed course gave students practice at evaluating examples of valid science and pseudoscience found on the internet; it also provided students opportunities to discuss what they think about learning science. Student attitudes and ideas were assessed using the epistemological beliefs assessment for physical science (EBAPS) survey, interviews, and written responses to an open-ended exam ques- tion. Our results indicate that the embedded curriculum led the majority of students in the transformed course to think that anyone can learn science, whereas a majority of students in the traditional course thought that only individuals with innate abilities can learn science and think scientifically. Students in the transformed course also reported much more confidence in their ability to evaluate the scientific validity of information found on the internet. Furthermore, students from the transformed course valued making sense of science more than students from the traditional course. The embedded curriculum could readily be used in any course for nonscience majors, not just introductory astronomy.
Affiliation:
University of Colorado–Boulder (CO)
Citation:
Duncan, D. K., & Arthurs, L. (2012). Improving student attitudes about learning science and student scientific reasoning skills.
Journal:
Astronomy Education Review
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/617171
Document Source:
Peer-reviewed
Language:
en_US
Type Of Resource:
Empirical Research
Empirical Methodology:
Mixed-methods
Learning Environment:
Formal
Subjects:
College Students
Construct:
Affective Variables; General Teaching Strategies; Nature of Science
Content:
n/a
Nation:
Canada
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDouglas, Duncanen
dc.contributor.authorLeilani, Arthursen
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-18T20:53:42Zen
dc.date.available2016-07-18T20:53:42Zen
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.citationDuncan, D. K., & Arthurs, L. (2012). Improving student attitudes about learning science and student scientific reasoning skills.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/617171en
dc.description.abstractStudent attitudes about learning science and student ideas about the nature of science were compared at the end of two astronomy courses taught in Fall 2007, a course with a traditional astronomy curriculum and a transformed course, whose traditional astronomy curriculum was supplemented by an embedded curriculum that explicitly addressed the nature of science and student metacognition (i.e., thinking about one’s own thinking.) The embedded curriculum in the transformed course gave students practice at evaluating examples of valid science and pseudoscience found on the internet; it also provided students opportunities to discuss what they think about learning science. Student attitudes and ideas were assessed using the epistemological beliefs assessment for physical science (EBAPS) survey, interviews, and written responses to an open-ended exam ques- tion. Our results indicate that the embedded curriculum led the majority of students in the transformed course to think that anyone can learn science, whereas a majority of students in the traditional course thought that only individuals with innate abilities can learn science and think scientifically. Students in the transformed course also reported much more confidence in their ability to evaluate the scientific validity of information found on the internet. Furthermore, students from the transformed course valued making sense of science more than students from the traditional course. The embedded curriculum could readily be used in any course for nonscience majors, not just introductory astronomy.en
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dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Coty Tatge (coty@caperteam.com) on 2016-07-18T20:53:42Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 DUNCANdouglas-et-al_2012-b_AER.pdf: 1001175 bytes, checksum: 211bae3a9de1e104c02f2d356c5e4148 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-07-18T20:53:42Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 DUNCANdouglas-et-al_2012-b_AER.pdf: 1001175 bytes, checksum: 211bae3a9de1e104c02f2d356c5e4148 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2012en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleImproving Student Attitudes about Learning Science and Student Scientific Reasoning Skillsen
dc.typePeer-revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Colorado–Boulder (CO)en
dc.identifier.journalAstronomy Education Reviewen
dc.type.resourceEmpirical Researchen
dc.istar.learningenvironmentFormalen
dc.istar.constructAffective Variablesen
dc.istar.constructGeneral Teaching Strategiesen
dc.istar.constructNature of Scienceen
dc.istar.contentn/aen
dc.istar.nationCanadaen
dc.istar.empiricalmethodologyMixed-methodsen
dc.istar.subjectCollege Studentsen
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