The Student as Scientist: Secondary Student Research Projects in Astronomy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/617196
Title:
The Student as Scientist: Secondary Student Research Projects in Astronomy
Authors:
Hollow, Rob, P.
Abstract:
Student research projects are becoming either integral or optional components of Science curricula in several countries. They provide a valuable opportunity for high school students to experience many of the joys and frustrations that make up the intellectual challenge of Science. Astronomy is one branch of Science that lends itself to student projects. Student Research Projects (SRPs) can be individual, group or collaborative between groups in other schools or countries and may involve professional mentors. Use of the Internet and remote access telescopes allow students to undertake challenging research and make worthwhile contributions to professional programs. This paper presents case studies of student projects in optical and radio astronomy from Australian and overseas schools and details both the benefits and problems faced in conducting such projects. Student responses to involvement in projects are discussed. Potential areas for future collaboration and development are highlighted together with the need for more research as to the most effective ways to implement projects and develop student skills.
Affiliation:
University of Western Sydney Nepean, Blue Mountains Grammar School
Citation:
Hollow, R. P. (2000). The Student as Scientist: Secondary Student Research Projects in Astronomy. Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia, 17, 162–167
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Journal:
Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia
Issue Date:
Aug-2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/617196
DOI:
10.1071/AS00162
Additional Links:
https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/publications-of-the-astronomical-society-of-australia/article/the-student-as-scientist-secondary-student-research-projects-in-astronomy/059084FE9C819C3C0CB09A25C35E56CE
Document Source:
Peer-reviewed
Language:
en
Type Of Resource:
Curriculum/Program Evaluation
Empirical Methodology:
Qualitative
Learning Environment:
Formal
Research Setting:
School Students
Subjects:
Middle/Secondary School Students
Construct:
Student Research Projects; Content Knowledge; Cognitive Processes; Quantitative Reasoning; Scientific Inquiry; Nature of Science; on
Content:
General/Broad Knowledge of Astronomy Content
Nation:
Australia
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHollow, Rob, P.-
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-29T17:43:47Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-29T17:43:47Z-
dc.date.issued2000-08-
dc.identifier.citationHollow, R. P. (2000). The Student as Scientist: Secondary Student Research Projects in Astronomy. Publications of the Astronomical Society of Australia, 17, 162–167en
dc.identifier.doi10.1071/AS00162-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/617196-
dc.description.abstractStudent research projects are becoming either integral or optional components of Science curricula in several countries. They provide a valuable opportunity for high school students to experience many of the joys and frustrations that make up the intellectual challenge of Science. Astronomy is one branch of Science that lends itself to student projects. Student Research Projects (SRPs) can be individual, group or collaborative between groups in other schools or countries and may involve professional mentors. Use of the Internet and remote access telescopes allow students to undertake challenging research and make worthwhile contributions to professional programs. This paper presents case studies of student projects in optical and radio astronomy from Australian and overseas schools and details both the benefits and problems faced in conducting such projects. Student responses to involvement in projects are discussed. Potential areas for future collaboration and development are highlighted together with the need for more research as to the most effective ways to implement projects and develop student skills.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Saeed Salimpour (astrophysics@saeedsalimpour.com) on 2016-09-26T14:39:33Z No. of bitstreams: 1 Hollow2000.pdf: 58677 bytes, checksum: 71a12c8f385f726272ae920df6882500 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Stephanie Slater (stephanie@caperteam.com) on 2016-09-29T17:43:46Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 Hollow2000.pdf: 58677 bytes, checksum: 71a12c8f385f726272ae920df6882500 (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-09-29T17:43:47Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 Hollow2000.pdf: 58677 bytes, checksum: 71a12c8f385f726272ae920df6882500 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2000-08en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/publications-of-the-astronomical-society-of-australia/article/the-student-as-scientist-secondary-student-research-projects-in-astronomy/059084FE9C819C3C0CB09A25C35E56CEen
dc.titleThe Student as Scientist: Secondary Student Research Projects in Astronomyen
dc.typePeer-revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Western Sydney Nepean, Blue Mountains Grammar Schoolen
dc.identifier.journalPublications of the Astronomical Society of Australiaen
dc.type.resourceCurriculum/Program Evaluationen
dc.istar.learningenvironmentFormalen
dc.istar.constructStudent Research Projectsen
dc.istar.constructContent Knowledgeen
dc.istar.constructCognitive Processesen
dc.istar.constructQuantitative Reasoningen
dc.istar.constructScientific Inquiryen
dc.istar.constructNature of Scienceen
dc.istar.constructonen
dc.istar.contentGeneral/Broad Knowledge of Astronomy Contenten
dc.istar.nationAustraliaen
dc.istar.empiricalmethodologyQualitativeen
dc.istar.researchsettingSchool Studentsen
dc.istar.subjectMiddle/Secondary School Studentsen
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