What It Would Take to Increase the Number of High School Astronomy Courses: A Survey of Principals and a Comparison to Astronomy Teachers, and a Prescription for Change

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/617215
Title:
What It Would Take to Increase the Number of High School Astronomy Courses: A Survey of Principals and a Comparison to Astronomy Teachers, and a Prescription for Change
Authors:
Larry, Krumenaker
Abstract:
A survey to principals of high schools without astronomy points to the conditions needed to increase the number of high school astronomy courses and acceptable justifications for adding in a course. The former includes the need for more and better trained teachers, changing the perceptions of higher officials from local administrations to Federal-level legislators and education department officials, more funds, locally a need for students to show enough interest as well as a curriculum that helps with high stakes testing and Adequate Yearly Progress AYP scoring. Good reasons for having a course include helping increase options for students needing science electives or fourth year courses, and astronomy reinforces prior learning that helps raise AYP scores and increases student interest in science with material not taught in other courses. Some inhibiting influences include the timing of the course is usually after AYP testing, standards may not exist or limit new electives, and a dearth of astronomy teachers locally. Results of this study include a list of competing electives, typical procedures and a prescription for adding in courses.
Affiliation:
University of Georgia
Citation:
Krumenaker, L. (2010). What It Would Take to Increase the Number of High School Astronomy Courses: A Survey of Principals and a Comparison to Astronomy Teachers, and a Prescription for Change. Astronomy Education Review, 9(1).
Journal:
Astronomy Education Review
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/11290/617215
Document Source:
Peer-reviewed
Language:
en_US
Type Of Resource:
Empirical Research
Empirical Methodology:
Quantitative
Learning Environment:
Formal
Subjects:
In-service Teachers
Construct:
Motivation to include Astronomy Course; Affective Variables; on
Content:
n/a
Nation:
Canada
Appears in Collections:
Astronomy Education Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLarry, Krumenakeren
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-29T17:53:08Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-29T17:53:08Z-
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.identifier.citationKrumenaker, L. (2010). What It Would Take to Increase the Number of High School Astronomy Courses: A Survey of Principals and a Comparison to Astronomy Teachers, and a Prescription for Change. Astronomy Education Review, 9(1).en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11290/617215-
dc.description.abstractA survey to principals of high schools without astronomy points to the conditions needed to increase the number of high school astronomy courses and acceptable justifications for adding in a course. The former includes the need for more and better trained teachers, changing the perceptions of higher officials from local administrations to Federal-level legislators and education department officials, more funds, locally a need for students to show enough interest as well as a curriculum that helps with high stakes testing and Adequate Yearly Progress AYP scoring. Good reasons for having a course include helping increase options for students needing science electives or fourth year courses, and astronomy reinforces prior learning that helps raise AYP scores and increases student interest in science with material not taught in other courses. Some inhibiting influences include the timing of the course is usually after AYP testing, standards may not exist or limit new electives, and a dearth of astronomy teachers locally. Results of this study include a list of competing electives, typical procedures and a prescription for adding in courses.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Coty Tatge (coty@caperteam.com) on 2016-07-19T17:13:46Z No. of bitstreams: 1 KRUMENAKERlarry_2010_AER.pdf: 221696 bytes, checksum: 91fca6cf996e357b6bdd13636df804ea (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Stephanie Slater (stephanie@caperteam.com) on 2016-09-29T17:53:08Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 1 KRUMENAKERlarry_2010_AER.pdf: 221696 bytes, checksum: 91fca6cf996e357b6bdd13636df804ea (MD5)en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2016-09-29T17:53:08Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 KRUMENAKERlarry_2010_AER.pdf: 221696 bytes, checksum: 91fca6cf996e357b6bdd13636df804ea (MD5) Previous issue date: 2010en
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleWhat It Would Take to Increase the Number of High School Astronomy Courses: A Survey of Principals and a Comparison to Astronomy Teachers, and a Prescription for Changeen
dc.typePeer-revieweden
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Georgiaen
dc.identifier.journalAstronomy Education Reviewen
dc.type.resourceEmpirical Researchen
dc.istar.learningenvironmentFormalen
dc.istar.constructMotivation to include Astronomy Courseen
dc.istar.constructAffective Variablesen
dc.istar.constructonen
dc.istar.contentn/aen
dc.istar.nationCanadaen
dc.istar.empiricalmethodologyQuantitativeen
dc.istar.subjectIn-service Teachersen
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